Children

Praying For Compassion

I pass their faces I don’t know how many times a day. They’re  held there on the door of our refrigerator, a cool box that holds more food at our fingertips than they probably see in a month.

That thought stings.

I put them there so I’d remember to pray for them, so I’d see them constantly and think of their needs, to remind me to pray for the things they lack–

We scratch out letters to them, and we pray for them and I dream about maybe meeting them someday. It’s a dream I don’t dare think about too much because I’m afraid to.

So I write to them, we pray for them, and when I hear my oldest pray, “God help them to love you with their whole heart” my momma heart quakes and rejoices in his heart-felt prayers for two kids he’s never met.

We pray for their health and safety, for God to provide for their needs and for their young hearts to be encouraged in their faith. We pray for their families to grow in Christ as they reap the benefits of the Compassion program.

We’re tempted to think that praying is not enough, but prayer changes things. (James 5:16) <—- Tweet this

God carries our words across all time and space and tucks them in His heart and moves according to His good purposes.

We’re making an effort to be more involved this year. We’re learning to be more intentional about our prayers, about our letters, about building the relationship with these two kids. Compassion isn’t just about meeting physical needs.

Compassion is about relationship. Compassion is about loving through words and actions, by His strength, for His glory.

Looking for resources to help with your Compassion letter writing? Need encouragement for how to stay engaged?

Not involved with Compassion yet?

What tips do you have to help stay engaged with your Compassion sponsorship? Do tell!

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12 thoughts on “Praying For Compassion

    1. alwaysalleluia

      Bless you, Sweet Jana. I am so thankful for the way God uses this ministry to stretch and challeneg my own faith. I love these babies and with each letter we recieve, I feel the tenderness burrowing deeper in. What a gift it is to be a part of this. Love you.

      Reply
      1. you should stop playing it a while. if you look at a screen or something, it makes your eyes irritated. it can even give you a small twitch if you play too much like blinking your eyes alot or blinknig them haferRe.erdnces : Was this answer helpful?

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      1. It’s the time of sowing that I seem to grow weary of at times, and I have to remember — if I don’t, then I will see the reaping. Only surrender and resting in His grace can I find the strength to not weary.

        Reply
  1. The relationships of ministry save us from going through the motions or making it into a chore. The more we really connect with people, the easier ministry becomes.

    Reply
    1. alwaysalleluia

      This is so true, Ed. Really, as a ministry leader (MOPS) I am learning the realities of serving in this capacity. Learning to connect on a very real/human level changes the ministry for the better. And really, if you’re not going to fully engage, perhaps that’s a clue that that ministry isn’t for you. I think we fail to honor God when we serve with our lip-service and half-hearted attempts–and we miss the blessings. I have been guilty of this in the past and God is refining this in me. It’s embarrasing to admit that even. We’re all works-in-progress! Thanks for commenting!

      Reply
      1. Indeed. Part of the problem for me is when I see a ministry need and serve out of duty or obligation or compassion for the leader who can’t find help! Discernment is so critical for ministry.

        Reply
        1. alwaysalleluia

          Ah, yes, I have been guilty of this as well. I am a people pleaser and sometimes have a difficult time saying “no” when I ought to. Discernment is a great word. Praying we grasp that as we seek out His plans for us. 😉

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